WELCOME!

"There are 70 pesticides that are listed as known or probable carcinogens, based on animal testing. Of those 70, 44 are in use today, and 23 are used on our food."

— Gina Solomon, specialist in internal medicine [2001]


Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Seeds From France



SEED SHARING

One of the great things about Community Gardening is the ability to share seeds, increase the diversity of what is grown locally. Recently, one of our Community Garden friends brought me back two varieties of Tomatoes grown in Selestat, France, 

One variety was a cherry Tomato that has been saved for three generations, of unknown variety. I'll take pictures this summer and update this story,

The second was a variety called Black From Tula. A picture was stolen from the Web and here it is below.


Here's a picture of it sliced at FULL RIPENESS! 
Can't you taste this Tomato?
If you are interested in getting a couple seeds to increase our Windsor, Ontario, Canada seed bank please feel free to contact us! 

When I look at this Tomato I think of Black Krim or a Cherokee Purple. Black Tomatoes are fascinatingly beautiful and juicy!

Here are it's Properties

Height:
4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)
6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:
24-36 in. (60-90 cm)
36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Seed Collecting:
Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds
Ferment seeds before storing
Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Growing Habit:
Indeterminate

Fruit Shape:
Flat/Oblate
Beefsteak

Fruit Size:
Medium (under one pound)

Days to Maturity:
Mid (69-80 days)

Fruit Colors:
Red
Black

Seed Type:
Open-pollinated

Usage:
Fresh, salad
Fresh, slicing





Thursday, January 22, 2015

Local Food Distribution Research - Windsor Essex County


Windsor Essex County Survey on Procurement of Local Food


Are you a Farmer, Grower, Producer, Processor, Restaurant, Small Grocer, Bulk Buyer of Local Food, School, Banquet Hall, Festival Organizer, Chef, Community Cook?

Participate in this Survey!

Research is being done to develop a model of Direct Procurement (Purchasing) Local Food from Local Producers, Local Farmers, Local Growers
In 
Windsor and Essex County!







Share this with somebody who might want to take the survey!
Thanks!

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Free Documentary - Save The Date!

s a v e  the d a t e !


FEBRUARY 23 2015
700 PM
@
WINDSOR PUBLIC LIBRARY
850 Ouellette Avenue, Windsor, ON N9A 4M9

DOCUMENTARY NIGHT

FREE!

COME IN OUT OF THE COLD!

LET'S ENJOY A NICE WARM COMMUNITY DOCUMENTARY!

FACEBOOK EVENT HERE

FREE: "Join us for a screening of the 2011 documentary titled “A Community of Gardeners” which looks at the history of community gardens in North America as well as the movement’s current renaissance. The documentary will be followed by a discussion lead by Steve Green, the Windsor Essex County Community Garden Collective's Network Coordinator. Find out how you can join the vibrant community garden movement!"










Monday, December 1, 2014

Kitchen Gardens = School Gardens



OK. I know you are excited about school gardens. This website and its resources are simply going to blow you away. 

I challenge any school board any where in Windsor and Essex County to watch this short video and then tell me that School Gardens are a bad idea. 

This is simply incredible!

Steve Green


A food philosophy that makes sense.

Stephanie Alexander has a vision that pleasurable food education is accessible to every Australian school with a primary curriculum.The not-for-profit Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation takes a revolutionary approach to food education focusing on pleasure, flavour and fun via the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program. 

The recipe for effective food education:

  • Encourage fun, flavour and texture through experiences that engage all the senses.
  • Model good food choices without resorting to pyramids or labels of ‘healthy’ or ‘unhealthy’.
  • Reinforce techniques repeatedly, providing the confidence to plant seeds or cook simple dishes at home.
  • Plan menus around the fresh, seasonal produce growing in the garden.
  • Use ingredients at their peak – seasonal herbs, crisp veggies, fresh fruits.
  • Expand culinary horizons, presenting cultural differences as fascinating rather than strange.
  • Expand vocabularies for describing foods, flavours, textures, plants and processes.
  • Food should be delicious and the cooking of fresh fruit and vegetables should be timed with great care.
  • Come together at the end of the cooking to share our meal around the table.

Stephanie says...
'I believe absolutely in the importance and power of the shared table.
In many cultures, eating together around a table is the centre of family life.
It is the meeting place, where thoughts are shared, ideas challenged,
news is exchanged and where the participants leave the table
restored in many ways.'